• 144

    144

  • A_25

    A_25

  • A_63

    A_63

  • 189

    189

  • 161

    161

We have 172 guests online

Books

Books

Hunting Trout 3rd Edition

SOLD OUT - This is my latest book and it takes up where Hunting Trout left off. After writing Hunting Trout and seeing it published, a whole heap of omissions came to mind – like fly fishing photography for example – plus I discovered there was a lot more I wanted to say about fly tying and fishing techniques than I had said in the 400 plus pages of Hunting Trout!

Artwork

Watercolour paintings and Pen and Ink sketches

I accept commissions for watercolour paintings and pen and ink sketches. I have included examples of my work here, but all of these have been sold and are in private collections.

Prices of all artworks on application.

To enquire about my artwork or to commission a piece simply email me with your requirements at sutcliffe@mweb.co.za or call me on 082 8041352

Tom Sutcliffe

Tom Sutcliffe

Wednesday, 19 May 2010 17:16

April May Newsletter and Diary

For more images of my trip to Rhodes follow the link at the bottom of this page...

 

End of the Western Cape season , the Kraalstroom and a Chinese Ferrari

Graeme Field on the Kraalstroom

Graeme Field on the Kraalstroom

The end of season here in the Western Cape didn’t so much tail off, as it usually does, as go out with a bang. I’d had a few days hunting fussy fish in thin water, sometimes blown apart by wind, sometimes blessed with gentle breezes and blue skies laced with puffy clouds and then all of a sudden the rains came, in two heavy cold fronts, lifting the rivers, dropping temperatures and all but putting and end to the hatches and the fishing. Even our last resort down here in times like this, the Holsloot, a tail-water fishery, was unreliable and miserly with its trout. There was a perfect day on some private water, the Kraalstroom, a tributary of the Elandspad, that we fished only a day or two before the first rains fell. I was with Ryan Weaver who manages the farm Fizantakraal and Graeme Field who runs a company called Liquid Horisons. The stream was bare bones and the trout spooked just lifting the rod to cast. In some bigger pockets we took a few trout on deep nymphs, but the Kraalstroom is such a magical place – ferns, ancient trees, gnarled roots, moss-covered stones – that it wouldn’t have mattered even if we hadn’t caught a thing.

Kraalstroom_Fisantekraal56_5

Moss, rocks, roots, mystery...

Graeme_Field_Kraalstroom_Fisantekraal56_1

Kraalstroom rainbow

Frederick_Mostert_22_7

Frederick Mostert

 

There was also a day when I fished one of our regular streams with rod maker, Steve Boshoff, and a friend from London, Frederick Mostert.  We caught more than a few trout on a day that Frederick described as one of the best he could remember and he got all his fish on a big dry fly, which sounds sort of counter-intuitive in a low stream but I will expand on that later. How I got to know Frederick, though, and what he does for a living is a whole story on its own, but let me just say that he has a Ferrari, a limited edition of only five ever made, and he owns the sixth – made in China! So, of course, you can sort of guess his profession. He’s a patent rights, intellectual property and brand protection lawyer working for one of the biggest companies in the business of high end, luxury products, Richemont. He spends plenty of his time in China closing down factories making Cartier watches, Mont Blanc pens, Purdey shot guns, yes, even Ferraris.  Steve and I agreed that he was the most interesting man we ever spent a day fishing with.

 

 

The Coq de Leon saddle hackle RAB and Bear Lodge Angler

As for the big dry fly, well Frederick was new to the dry fly on fast streams and if there’s one essential ingredient to doing that well, it’s that you have to be able to see the fly. The big RABs I tie stand out like quivering haystacks so that’s what I gave him. I call them High Water RABs, and I tie them with ultra-wide, dark speckled-bronze Coq de Leon (CdL) saddle hackles. I tie them for rough riffle water when the rivers are up where they are hard to beat. Frederick couldn’t miss seeing the RABs and they worked.  In an hour or two he landed half a dozen nice fish.

The CdL saddle I got from Ed Herbst who in turn brought it in through Bill and Kathi Morrison of Bear Lodge Angler in Wyoming. Both Ed and I have been doing business with them for years and I rate Bill as one of the most effective locators of fly tying materials I have ever come across.  You’ll find his business at www.bearlodgeangler.com.  Their prices are very reasonable, the range is outstanding and delivery is sharp.

Rhodes, Branksome and Gateshead

Jeremy_Gateshead_26_4

A beautiful run. The upper Bokspruit on Gateshead

Jeremy_Gateshead_26_5

Gateshead

Rhodes this year was close to heaven. The rivers were perfect and clear, although Tony Kietzman who guides in the area, told me that the level in the Bokspruit had dropped maybe six inches from the previous week and the bigger fish had been replaced with slightly smaller ones in greater abundance. How that works I don’t know, but I don’t argue with the wisdom of the locals. I was planning to fish alone, which I did for a few days, but chance encounters with a couple of anglers who happened to be up there at the time, meant that I got in four or five trips with company.

The fishing was not as typically good as it gets in this part of the world, but then there wasn’t a day when we were anywhere near skunked. I’d have said that in the colder water a nymph on an indicator would work better than a dry fly, and I probably would have used little else, but two of the lads I fished with were dry fly fanatics. They caught plenty of fish, but I suspect if you were after the bigger fish, say 15 inches and over, a slow, deep nymph was the way to go. To hook the better fish up here you need to concentrate on the deeper slots and fish them really well – meaning to take your time on getting more than a few drifts into likely places and then making sure that the fly was coming through deep enough. That’s how you catch the big fish here. You hunt them. The honey holes are those deep, darker green looking spots under root-bound banks. If you dead drift through the shallower runs and riffles you will always get plenty of fish, but they are likely to be smaller. Then, of course, if the fishing is slow a Leisenring Lift helps. All this does is add movement to induce a take.  The LL amounts to a slow, even lift of the rod tip to bring upward movement into the fly.

The landscapes were spectacular this autumn, particularly on Branksome, Basie and Carien Vosloo’s farm just upstream of Birkhall. I had a lovely day here fishing with Ritchie Morris and Mark Ransome. In places the river was alight with the incandescent yellow reflections of poplars, but the willows were still hanging onto their greenness. The veld too had turned a deep russet red and in the clear air the distant mountains were pretty shades of pastel blue and purple.

Gateshead and Tony Kietzman

Tony_Kietzman_Glass_Niven_4_3

The Bell on Glass Niven

Tony_Lietzman_Glass_Niven_9_2

Tony Kietzman on Glass Niven

I ended up fishing the usual waters – the Sterkspruit, the Bell and the Bokspruit – all of them lovely, but I came to the conclusion that if there is a dry fly stream designed by God for himself and his Saints, it is the Bokspruit at Gateshead. I was with Tony and four guys from Cape Town, Paul Mukheiber, Dave Lefeuvre, Jeremy Duthie and Guy Sampson. Again we met up by chance and sort of guided them a few times on this trip (not that they needed much instruction). We told them that our usual guiding fee of R600 an hour and R600 per Coq de Leon-hackled RAB, was a steal!  They reciprocated with some of the better river lunches I have known. My friend Agostino Gaglio from Klerksdorp does a good riverside Mediterranean spread – salamis, Parma ham, rockets, sun dried tomatoes, cheeses, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, crusty rolls and so on – but these guys were the pasta kings. At times I had two dinky gas stoves burning on the tailgate of my truck, one with a pot of water on it for the pasta, the other with a pan for the sauce. The pasta was served hot, even sprinkled with Parmesan cheese. And their coffee was real, not the sort of instant stuff I normally drink on streams.

Tony Kietzman is a wonderful companion on a fly stream. He has been living in Rhodes now for two years and apart from understanding fly fishing – and its attendant poetry – he is an expert on local plants, including the rich alpine flora, and the local bird species. To contact Tony call 082 8943946 or email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  For a visit to Branksome or Gateshead contact Carien Vosloo on 045 9749303 or 082 49331132. Tony will soon have his own page on this web site and Carien is getting her Gateshead Lodges up and running again.

Branksome_poplar_landscape_8

Poplars in autumn colours, the Sterkspruit on Branksome

Branksome_14

Mark Ransome on the Branksome section of the Sterkspruit

Lindesfarne_7

Rainbow from the Sterkspruit on Lindesfarne

Maclear, Richard Viedge, Vrederus and the Diepspruit.

On the drive up to Rhodes Lionel Reid, called my cell phone waxing lyrical about the fishing they had in the streams around Maclear along with Richard Viedge, a guide in the area.  Lionel was in his car at the time on his way to fish the Diepspruit on a farm called Ross Trevor. The Diepspruit is in the New England district twenty odd kilometres west of Barkly East. This is a relatively unsung stream and it shouldn’t be. I remember Ed Herbst and I once fished a section after walking a fair way downstream where we found something of a gorge. We got a few pretty trout and over the years we have had some good fishing in the Diepspruit on the farm Millard. Lionel called me the next morning. Sadly, they were leaving to head home to Johannesburg otherwise I would have driven across to fish the Diepspruit with him, but he said the fishing had been sensational – very strong trout, excellent condition and relatively big fish.

It sounds as if the streams on the Maclear/Ugie side of the southern Drakensberg are really doing well. I must say I long to get back to this area – onto streams like the Wildebeest, the Mooi and the Upper Pott. I had hoped to get there this trip, but a flu-like bug put an end to that. Ed Herbst and Tony Kietzman recently fished a high section of the Wildebeest and said it was as good as heaven. As it happens I have just put the phone down after chatting to Richard Viedge. He said the rivers have never looked better in this patch on the Planet and last week a friend of his took a 16 inch rainbow from the Upper Pott, a tiny, beautiful stream on a dry fly! I told Richard I’d be seeing him come September!

For those of you wanting to have some more facts about this area contact Richard on 082 6571728 or email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. For accommodation, I recommend staying with Juan-Marie Naude at Vrederus (phone 045 9321572) or at www.linecasters.co.za/vrederus/diary.htm .

Landscape_Bokspruit_road_1

Landscapes from heaven. The Bokspruit valley

To view more images taken on this trip follow this link to the Image Gallery 

 

Tuesday, 05 June 2012 04:25

The pretty Broederstroom

The Broederstroom

Photos by Christoff Badenhorst

Situated in the beautiful Magoebaskloof area and started in 1911, the Haernertsburg Trout Association is one of the oldest fly fishing clubs in South Africa. Among its many waters is the pretty Broederstroom, a brown and rainbow trout stream captured here by Christoff Badenhorst.

http://www.htatrout.co.za/Home.html

Broederstroom_1

 

Broederstroom_4

 

Broederstroom_11

 

Broederstroom_17

 

Broederstroom_16

 

Broederstroom_18

 

 

Friday, 06 April 2012 13:46

DRAGONS ON A DRY FLY

DRAGONS ON DRY FLY

Pete Brigg sent me this piece with lovely images following a recent trip he made to the Bushman’s River in KZN:

I had a first yesterday. A large, approximately 8 to 10cm dragonfly took my fly out of the air in the cast, wouldn't let go and eventually became so tangled in the tippet there was no escape.
Dragonfly_caught_in_tippet_2
Dragonfly_caught_in_tippet

It was strong enough the keep the leader, tippet and fly up in the air until I managed to get hold of the leader and pull him down for a few photographs. Here are a few to visually relate the story, including the fly that fooled him and also a couple of Browns.
Peter_Brigg_fly
Pete Brigg's pattern that fooled a few trout and a dragonfly
Brown_trout_Bushmans_River

I'm happy to report that all were successfully released with the help of Shaun Futter – dragonfly and brownies.

I have similar stories to relate and so does Ed Herbst.
I was fishing the Elandspad a year or three back with Ed Gerber when a dragonfly swooped on his Black Gnat in mid air and got itself tangled. 
Dragonfly_on_a_dry_fly
Dragonfly caught up on the Elandspad, Western Cape
Then more recently, Anthony Church and I had a similar experience, only this time the dragon pounced on the dry fly while it was in the drift then put up a fine aerial display before it got tangled in the tippet. Again, both dragons were released unharmed.
IMG_3761-1
My son, Robert. Moments before he'd hooked a cow in paddock beyond the fence
Talking about hooking strange things, there was a story of someone once releasing a swallow on the Smalblaar but I’ve never been able to verify this.
Then I was present a year back when my son hooked a cow in the back leg. It was grazing behind a fence in a paddock adjacent the river Test in Hampshire. On 7X it broke him off smartly.
In Upstream, a Cape Town fly tackle shop, John Yelland showed me a video of an angler playing a fish from a float tube. Suddenly he discovers the ‘trout’ is actually a metre long puff adder. After that I noticed his back paddling became highly impressive!
But the pièce de résistance came from my old friend the late John Beams who told me he once hooked a moorhen fishing a pond in England at night. Apparently all hell broke loose but I’ll leave your imagination to work through the scene that followed.
For anyone interested in dragonflies – but more especially South African birds – here’s a site you will bless me for forever. Of its kind it’s the best in the business.
Ed Herbst responded to the dragonfly stories with this most interesting piece:

On the stream I fish the most, the Holsloot – which is about a 90 minute drive from Cape Town - dragonflies are prolific and they routinely dip down to examine your fly in flight. However, as the internet extracts (below) indicate, they have both exceptional flying agility and eyesight. As a result they usually bank away from the fly, obviously recognising that it is not prey.
However, on several occasions in the past thirty years, I have had them seize the fly and become entangled with it and the tippet. They are strong enough to remain in the air despite this encumbrance and I have just hand-lined them in and untangled them. They have always flown away, seemingly unharmed.
So prolific are they in the Holsloot area that South Africa’s leading dragonfly authority, Warwick Tarboton, makes an annual visit to stay at the cottages on Dwarsberg farm in the hopes of photographing some of the rarer species found there.


I believe trout are fully aware of the presence of dragonflies and can track them in the air. This, I believe, is why large Variants such as Tony Biggs’ RABs, with their slow, parachuting descent, are so successful on the small streams of the Western Cape

Internet documents sourced by Ed Herbst:
‘Dragonflies may be the best fliers on Earth. They can fly forward, backward and turn almost instantly. They can hover, turn while hovering and accelerate to full speed in a split second, then glide effortlessly’
Navy_Dropwing_Holsloot_River
A Navy Drop Wing photographed on the Holsloot River, Western Cape
‘Dragonflies are top-notch pilots. They not only fly fast, but also have excellent control over their manoeuvres in midair. When they jet along riverbanks or in wetland areas, they hold out their spiny legs in front to make little baskets for catching flying insects. They do not travel aimlessly, hoping an unlucky bug will somehow fly into their traps. Rather, they know exactly where to go. Dragonflies have two very big compound eyes, covering most of their heads. They see very well, so even the slightest movement will not escape them. As soon as they find a target, they track it down, scoop it up, and devour it. They complete the whole series of actions all while in flight!
Stream_Hawker_Holsloot_River
A Stream Hawker drogonfly taken on the Holsloot River
‘Of course, dragonflies' swiftness and unique build for flight do not go unnoticed. Among all insects, they are the record holders of two titles. The first is for their speed. Dragonflies are the fastest flying insects in the world. As they beat their four long, membranous wings vigorously, they can accelerate up to 60 miles per hour! The second is for their bulging eyes. Dragonflies possess such large eyes that no other insects can even come close to try to challenge the claim. They have a field of vision nearly 360 degrees!’

Wednesday, 01 February 2012 15:50

STERKFONTEIN DAM - A DRAMATIC PLACE

THE STERKFONTEIN YELLOWFISH EXPERIENCE

Text Tom Sutcliffe Pictures by Damon Mathfield

Sterkfontein_Dam_1

People are now rating this great impoundment as one of the country’s premier fly fishing destinations and deservedly so. Here’s what Jan Korrubel had to say of a recent trip there…

‘I was privileged to spend 2 days of the week before up at Sterkfontein Dam fishing for smallmouth yellows.  I now know why they call Sterkfontein an "Experience" and the smallmouth yellows there "Mini-V8's".  With that expanse of water and the fishing opportunities there, I can also see why folks can dedicate their lives to the place.  The take of those smallmouth yellows is something else - "Freshwater Bonefish" is probably an overused description, but I can think of nothing better...!’

Jan puts it well. And remember the clarity of the water provides plenty of sight fishing opportunities. But I think there’s much more to the fishing here than just the fish. I have seen some of the most spectacular cloud scenery build up over this water – followed often enough by spectacular displays of lightening and thunder and driving rain. It’s a very visceral, earthy experience in a fishing landscape that anyway must rate among the most dramatic in the world.

Here Damon Mathfield shares some of his images of this magnificent venue. It’s a wonderful tapestry showing the place in all its moods.

Sterkfontein_Dam_2

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_5

Sterkfontein_Dam_7

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_8

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_6

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_9

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_12

 

Sterkfontein_Dam_13

 

Tuesday, 31 January 2012 16:35

THE JDT's

CRAIG THOM'S IMAGES OF THE JDT'S

The JDT's is one of the finest Cape streams, no easy hike, no easy fishing, but a visit is fly fishing's equivalent of a catharsis. Here are some images Craig Thom sent of his most recent visit.

Jan_du_Toits_River_Western_Cape_5

 

Jan_du_Toits_River_Western_Cape_4

Bamboo rod maker at rest - Steve Boshoff takes a well earned breather

Jan_du_Toits_River_Western_Cape_2

As they say, there are clear streams - and the there's the JDT's!

Jan_du_Toits_River_Western_Cape_3

Wendy Thom climbing out of the JDT's - vertigo?

Thanks Craig, great little photo essay!


Sunday, 15 January 2012 09:29

THE UPPER SAALBOOM RIVER

JAN MALAN WRITES ABOUT A GLIMPSE HE GOT OF THE UPPER SAALBOOM RIVER, BARKLY EAST DISTRICT

Upper_Saalboom_3

A lovely piece of investigative fly fishing – or fly fishing R & D

Jan wrote recently

‘I've been meaning to send you these shots for a long time, but only now getting round to it. They are not great photography, but it’s more the stream that fascinated me. On the way to Rhodes early in the year (around March/April), we drove over the Erasmus Pass which drops you close to Barkly East. (I think Jan means Greyling’s Pass here, because I phoned two knowledgeable Rhodes locals today, Basie Vosloo and Dave Walker, and neither had heard of the Erasmus Pass. Should you care to look at it on Google Earth, the road is the R396 from Dordrecht to Barkly. See http://samountainpasses.co.za/EasternCape/EasternCapePasses/GreylingsPass/Map/tabid/1124/Default.aspx )

On_the_way_up_Erasmus_Pass

It’s a beautiful drive and on the Dordrecht side as you approach the pass there are some spectacular mountain views. There was also a tiny stream on that side, running close to the deeper folds of the mountains and it looked almost fishable, but since we were driving in rain it would be difficult to judge whether it is perennial.

Unfortunately don't have any usable shots of that one. On the other side though, we crossed the upper Saalboom River and it looked very good in these upper reaches. One hears little of the Saalboom, although I know it gets fished a bit lower down for some really big trout in the slower, deeper holes. This upper water, however, reminded me a lot of Ben Lawers on the Bell River and it looked like near perfect small water. I was wondering if you know anything about it.’

Upper_Saalboom_1

Upper_Saalboom_2

Upper_Saalboom_3

Upper_Saalboom_4

NOTE

Clearly this is a stream with great potential. I did fish the Saalboom many years back with Jake Alletson, also as I recall on one of the upper sections where we got a few brown trout. So did my friend Gijsbert Hoogendoorn, who wrote to me mid last year as follows…

‘The next day we decided to fish the Saalboom on Vaalkop.  This day proved to be successful. Jan got 16 and 17 inch rainbows on drop-offs in large pools. A very large version (#10) of Darryl Lampert’s CDC nymph did the trick.  That evening a massive rainstorm came down onto the Barkly area with the Sterkspruit and Saalboom staying murky for the duration of our trip.’

IF YOU HAVE SOME EXPERIENCE OF THIS STREAM I WOULD BE DELIGHTED TO HEAR FROM YOU SO THAT WE CAN BUILD ON THIS POSTING. ANY INAGES, OF COURSE, WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.

READERS IMAGES PART 15 – NEIL HAYES HILL ON THE OKAVANGO AND ON HIS ART

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_2

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_3

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_7

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_12

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_11

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_5

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_14


Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_10


Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_1

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_17

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_25

 

Fly_Fishing_the_Okavango_Delta_16

An abbreviated biography From Neil Hayes-Hill

My paternal grandfather, Harry Hayes-Hill, fished the upper Zambezi annually at Nantunga channel, Caprivi, and took me along during my teenage years in the 60's, where I unwittingly learnt about delicate marine environments; the matter that Nembwe yellow bream and other serranochromis had pharyngeal gill teeth proving their predatorship, whereas the Njini Three-spot breams ( ex tilapia, now oreochromis ) had smooth gills; that most bream species above the six 100 000 yr old gorges of Victoria Falls are predatory and are completely different to the diatomite grazing bream species below the falls where you have to fish with earth worms (39 species of fish below the falls and 89 species above). This I found fascinating.

 

The camp would be set up at Nantunga amongst some huge trees about a four hour’s boat drive up the Zambezi from Chobe via the Kasai channel, with old wooden speedboats with 50 hp Mercurys.

Being artistic, I immediately started painting field studies of the numerous Zambezi fish species, rather like the caveman who painted prey onto rock faces, hoping to elicit a spiritual advantage for his next hunt. And the better the sketch, the better the spiritual advantage would be! Furthermore, taxidermying the fish species may work even better, so I also took that up.

 

Jeff Richmond taught me how to fly fish at his family’s berg farm Blydskap in the Kerkenberg, near Olivier's Hoek, in the early 70's, and I have rarely used "whirr-whirr-clunk-clunk" mechanical gear since, and decided to remain, as described by some, a "self disadvantaged-line entanglement-fisherman". Fly fishing is undoubtedly an environmental recreational challenge that is hugely satisfying to the human psychic, solves the atavistic caveman instincts and is an invaluable contributor to our fast deteriorating natural world.

 

I have met and fished with some serious, world class flyfishers: the late Keith Miller, Greg Wright and Piet Snyman, who for some years held numerous tippet class IGFA Tigerfish records; and lately a fellow called Andrew Parsons who is the master guide on the oceanic fly-fishing mother ship Pangaea see http://www.rnryachts.com/Pangaea.html

 

In terms of my architectural profession, I have been fortunate to become involved for some years now in upmarket African Safari lodge and hotel design, all over Africa from Victoria Falls Zambia ( Royal Livingstone) to Namibia, to the Gabon, the Middle East, Brazil, and presently have an "Africanization " brief for a Safari Hotel being developed in West Midlands UK.  I have won some design and environmental awards.  Other projects have been voted the best boutique hotels in the world - see  http://www.tintswalo.com/ATLANTIC/atlantic_home.html

 

Friday, 02 December 2011 04:43

VALENTINE ATKINSON'S PHOTOGRAPHY

 

VALENTINE ATKINSON IN FLY FISHING PHOTOGRAPHY

ffimage_1

 

Val has kindly contributed a heap of pictures to the site. I have made a random selection with the aim of giving you some insights into what has made this man arguably the most eminent fly fishing photographer of all time. It’s a medley of pictures ranging from scenes in New Zealand, to Alaska, the Bahamas, Seychelles, Terre del Fuego and high mountain streams in the Sierra Neva after the rare golden trout. Note his eye for the human touch, sometimes for the absurd, and his wonderful sense of colour and composition.

Atkinson was voted into the California Fly Fishing Hall of Fame by the Northern California Council of the Federation of Fly Fishers (FFF) in March 2003.

 Alaska_Val_Atkinson_4

ABOUT VALENTINE ATKINSON

‘I caught my first trout on a fly rod at the age of seven. That hatchery fish from the Wissahickon Park in Philadelphia sparked a flame that still keeps me warm.

Twenty years ago I started taking a camera on fishing trips after realizing that there was a lot more to angling than catching fish. Over the years I have learned to combine these two passions into my life's work. My four books fulfil a dream of enabling me to share these passions with you. I've now travelled to 29 countries on assignments and I must confess that in recent years the challenge of making a really great image has started to transcend my desire to catch fish. However, fly fishing and photography go very well together. The secret is knowing when to put down the rod and pick up the camera. 

These days I travel farther afield but it's the same quest for beauty and solitude that motivate me. It is my sincere desire that my images share with you the passion for these wild and romantic places. If they do, then hopefully you will share the desire to cherish, respect and protect what wilderness remains in the world and actively resist the greed which flourishes and threatens, that your children and grandchildren will also see these places one day and find them as lovely as they appear here.

Here's to Truth, Adventure and Passion’

_DSC5834-9

_DSC6361-25

_DSC7327-15

 

Alaska_Val_Atkinson_2

 

Alaska_Val_Atkinson_3

 

Alaska_Val_Atkinson_5

 

fall_river_flyover-4

 

Golden_trout-Valentine_Atkinson_1

Golden trout

Golden_trout-Valentine_Atkinson_3

Golden's habitat

Golden_trout-Valentine_Atkinson_4

 

Golden_trout-Valentine_Atkinson_5

 

Golden_trout-Valentine_Atkinson_7

 

IMG0035-5

 

New_Zealand_Val_Atkinson

New Zealand

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_1

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_2

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_3

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_4

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_5

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_6

 

New_Zealand_Valentine_Atkinson_7

 

Terra_del_Fuego_Val_Atkinson_1

Terra del Fuego

Terra_del_Fuego_Val_Atkinson_2

 

Terra_Del_Fuego_Valentine_Atkinson

 

Thailand-2

 

Thailand_1-

 

Thailand--12

Thailand--25

Thailand-76



 

BOOKS BROWN TROUT VALENTINE ATKINSON

The Greatest Fly Fishing Around the World: Trout, Salmon, and Saltwater Fishing on the World's Most Beautiful Waters

5383560

Trout and Salmon: The Greatest Fly Fishing for Trout and Salmon Worldwide

2646614

Friends on the Water: Fly Fishing in Good Company

1588531

Distant Waters: The Greatest Fly-fishing Worldwide

1165905

by R. Valentine AtkinsonNick Lyons (Foreword)

Fifty Places to Fly Fish Before You Die

by Chris SantellaMike FitzgeraldR. Valentine Atkinson (Photographer)

Saturday, 26 November 2011 06:39

READER'S IMAGES PART 14 - LOTHENI AND BUSHMAN'S

FLY FISHING THE BUSHMAN’S AND LOTHENI RIVERS IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE DRAKENSBERG KZN

Photo essay from Darryl Lampert

I was delighted to get these images and hear of this two day trip from Darryl and Jan Korrubel because for too long these streams were trapped in a drought and too low to fish. I know them both. They run in splendid landscapes and their brown trout are a joy. Jan tells me they caught all but one fish on dry fly. If you enjoy ultra-fine small stream fly fishing for trout neither of these streams is a bad place to find yourself.

(See also http://www.tomsutcliffe.co.za/component/content/article/40-readers-images/219-a-day-on-the-bushmans-and-lotheni for more images on this sortie)

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_5

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_1

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_3

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_4

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_8

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_9

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_2

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_6

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_10

 

Fly_fishing_Drakensberg_streams_7

 

Monday, 21 November 2011 04:15

READER'S IMAGES PART 13

READER'S IMAGES PART 13

From Ruhan Neethling in South Island, New Zealand
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_1
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_3
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_5
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_6
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_10
New_Zealand_south_island_fishing_9
Storm damage in the Nottingham Road area KZN from Jan Korrubel

Storm_damage_KZN_1
Storm_damage_KZN_2
Storm_damage_KZN_3